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People

  1. Faculty
  2. Staff
  3. Forum Affiliates

Faculty

Dr. Kun-Chin Lin
  • Dr. Kun-Chin Lin is the Deputy Director of the Forum on Geopolitics. He is a university lecturer in politics and Director of the Centre for Rising Powers at the University of Cambridge. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College, and obtained his PhD in political science from the University of California at Berkeley. Kun-Chin was a Leverhulme postdoctoral fellow at the University of Oxford and taught at King's College London and the National University of Singapore.
  • His research focuses on the politics of market reform in developing countries. His current projects include federalism and regulatory issues in transport infrastructure and electricity grid expansion in China, industrial policy and privatization of Chinese state-owned enterprises, and the economic and security nexus in maritime governance in Asia and the Arctic. He is a member of Energy@Cambridge, Cambridge Centre for the Environment, Energy and Natural Resource Governance, Centre for Science & Policy of the University of Cambridge, and a collaborating partner of the Global Biopolitics Research Group based at King’s College London.
  • Kun-Chin is an editorial board member of Business & Politics, and an advisory board member of Routledge Research on the Politics and Sociology of China Series and Palgrave MacMillan Studies in the Political Economy of Public Policy Series. He is an Associate Fellow of the Asia Programme of the Chatham House.
01223 767 262
Professor Brendan Simms
  • Professor of the History of European International Relations
  • Brendan Simms is an expert on European geopolitics, past and present. His principal interests are the German Question, Britain and Europe, Humanitarian Intervention and state construction. He teaches at both undergraduate and graduate level in the Department of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) and the Faculty of History. His MPhil course on the History European Geopolitics (co-taught with Dr Charlie Laderman) uses scenarios as part of the teaching and learning process. He has supervised PhD dissertations on subjects as diverse as Intervention and State Sovereignty in the Holy Roman Empire, Sinn Fein, the American colonist and the eighteenth-century European state system, the Office of the UN High Representative in Bosnia, and German Civil-Military relations.
  • Brendan Simms is a frequent contributor to print and broadsheet media. He has advised governments and parliaments, and spoken at Westminster, in the European parliament and at think-tanks in the United Kingdom, the United States and in many Eurozone countries. The Centre for Geopolitics is designed to draw together all these interests.

Staff

Isabella Warren
  • Research and Admin Assistant
  • Isabella Warren joined POLIS in November 2016 as Research Assistant at the Centre for Rising Powers, assisting the Director Dr Kun Chin Lin on the project “Maritime Governance in 21st Century Asia”. Isabella has organised conferences, talks, provided research support, including bibliographic resources, for Dr Lin’s research group.
  • She is a Russian linguist having graduated from the University of Durham in 1975. Later she was awarded a Diploma in East-West Trade Studies. After working for the British Council, the Central Office of Information and the Bell School of Languages, she took up the post of Russian Bibliographer at the Scott Polar Research Institute (SPRI), University of Cambridge in October 1990 where she remained until November 2016.
  • During her time at SPRI Isabella supported the research of UK and international scholars of the Russian North. She maintained strong links with Russian institutions and made several trips to the country to strengthen contacts and obtain publications and other research materials unavailable through normal channels. The Russian Collection in the SPRI Library is extensive and unrivalled. During her time at SPRI she developed a wide network of scholars, writers, journalists and individuals pursuing their own research on the Russian North and Arctic.
  • In COGGS she works as both as a Research Assistant and Admin Assistant

Forum Affiliates

Dr Michael Axworthy
  • Dr Michael Axworthy (26 September 1962 - 16 March 2019) was the founding director of the 'A Westphalia for the Middle East' project at the Forum on Geopolitics.
  • Michael was a historian of Iran, and published widely on this subject, in the form of both important books and articles. He was also a frequent contributor to print and broadcast media. His books include The Sword of Persia: Nader Shah, from Tribal Warrior to Conquering Tyrant; Empire of the Mind: A History of Iran; Revolutionary Iran: A History of the Islamic Republic; Iran: what everyone needs to know; and as editor, Crisis, collapse, militarism and civil war: the history and historiography of 18th century Iran.
  • After years at the FCO, including two years as head of the Iran section, he switched to an academic career, teaching Middle East history at Durham and Exeter, where he became Director of the Centre for Persian and Iranian Studies. In 2017 he was a Visiting Fellow at Peterhouse, Cambridge, and in the following year became a Senior Research Associate at that college. From late 2015 onwards he launched the Westphalia for the Middle East project at the Forum on Geopolitics, together with Prof. Brendan Simms and Dr Patrick Milton, and remained a crucial intellectual and practical driving force behind that undertaking, co-writing the project’s chief output, the book Towards a Westphalia for the Middle East at the end of 2018.
Dr C J Jenner
  • Christopher John Jenner is First Sea Lord Fellow; Research Associate, Centre of Geopolitics and Grand Strategy, University of Cambridge; Research Fellow, King’s College London; and Senior Research Fellow, Institute for China-America Studies. He holds Master of Studies and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Modern History from the University of Oxford. He has won various awards and fellowships: Economic and Social Research Council Fellow, University of Oxford; Research Fellow, Corbett Centre for Maritime Policy Studies, Joint Services Command and Staff College, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom; Research Fellow, New England Centre and Home for Veterans; Research Fellow, St Cross College, University of Oxford; Research and Teaching Fellow, University of London; Research Fellow, University of Massachusetts; Research Fellow, William Joiner Institute for the Study of War and Social Consequences; and Visiting Research Fellow, Diplomatic Academy of Vietnam (Học viện Ngoại giao Việt Nam), Hanoi. At Cambridge, he is leading the Forum on Geopolitics’ work on the Indo-Pacific, and two international research projects: (i) an investigation of sea power’s influence on relations between the People’s Republic of China and the United States of America, 1949-1996; and (ii) an account of the conception and formative conduct of the unique alliance between the cryptographic services of Great Britain and the United States, 1940-1943. In addition to his academic work, Dr Jenner undertakes governmental analytical commissions, and has contributed to award-winning television series.
Timothy Less
  • Timothy is director of the Nova Europa consultancy, which provides political risk analysis of Eastern Europe and a member of Darwin College, where he is conducting research on the geopolitics of Southeastern Europe. He studied Contemporary Eastern European Politics at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London and International Relations at the University of Cambridge.
  • Previously, Tim spent a decade working as an analyst, diplomat and policymaker at the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office where, among other things, he served as the Political Secretary in Skopje (Macedonia), ran the British Embassy Office in Banja Luka (Bosnia) and the EU Institutions Department, and led the Prime Minister’s initiative on Countries at Risk of Instability. He is also a former lecturer in Eastern European Politics at the University of Kent and a former risk analyst for the ratings agency, Dun & Bradstreet, where he covered the Balkans and the former Soviet Union.
Dr Patrick Milton
  • Patrick Milton is a postdoctoral research fellow at Peterhouse as part of the Westphalia for the Middle East project. His research interests include the history of intervention for the protection of foreign subjects in early modern central Europe, the political and constitutional history of the Holy Roman Empire, early modern international relations, and the long-term impact of the Peace of Westphalia with a particular emphasis on its mutual guarantee. At the Forum on Geopolitics, he is a Research Affiliate of the ‘A Westphalia for the Middle East’ Laboratory for World Construction, which seeks to draw lessons from the treaties of Westphalia (1648) for a new peace settlement for the Middle East. He was previously a visiting fellow at the Leibniz-Institute of European History, Mainz. He holds a PhD and a BA in History from the University of Cambridge, and an MA in International Relations from the University of Warwick. His work has been awarded the 2013 German History Society/Royal Historical Society Postgraduate Essay Prize.
Thomas Peak
  • Thomas Peak is the Research and Outreach Officer at the Engelsberg Programme for Applied History for the Forum on Geopolitics. His research interests intersect international relations theory and international history, with a particular focus on sovereignty and international politics in Early Modern Europe, ethics and historical development of humanitarian intervention, international relations theory, R2P, conflict in the contemporary Middle East, and topics in seventeenth century global history and the Thirty Years War.
Suzanne Raine
  • Suzanne worked for 24 years in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on foreign policy and national security issues. This included postings in Poland, Iraq and Pakistan. She specialised in counter-terrorism and holding a number of senior domestic appointments.
  • She was also a senior member of the UK government assessment community, and is on the Board of Trustees of the Imperial War Museum.
Dr Aaron Rapport (1981-2019)
  • Aaron Rapport is a lecturer in Cambridge's Department of Politics and International Studies and a fellow at Corpus Christi College. He was previously an assistant professor of political science at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Prior to receiving his PhD in Political Science from the University of Minnesota, he held pre-doctoral fellowships at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University and the Miller Center at the University of Virginia. His research interests include international security, political psychology, and U.S. foreign policy. His book, _Waging War, Planning Peace: U.S. Noncombat Operations and Major Wars_, was published in 2015 by Cornell University Press in its Security Affairs series. His work has also appeared in leading journals of international relations such as International Security, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Peace Research, and Security Studies. He has taught undergraduate and graduate level courses on international relations theory, foreign policy analysis, security studies, and qualitative research methodology.
Dr Stefano Recchia
  • Stefano Recchia’s principal research interests are in international security studies, foreign policy analysis (especially military intervention decision making), and just war theory. His monograph, Reassuring the Reluctant Warriors: US Civil-Military Relations and Multilateral Intervention, was published in 2015 in the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs book series. The book develops a new explanation of when and why the United States seeks formal multilateral approval from organisations such as the United Nations or NATO for its military interventions. Drawing on nearly 100 interviews conducted with senior US officials, Recchia argues that America's top-ranking generals, as reluctant warriors who value international burden sharing, play an under appreciated role in steering US intervention policy toward multilateral engagement. Recchia’s research has also appeared in a variety of peer-reviewed journals, including Ethics & International Affairs, International Theory, the Journal of Strategic Studies, Security Studies, and the Review of International Studies.
Dr Ayse Zarakol
  • Ayşe Zarakol is Reader in International Relations in the POLIS Department and a Fellow at Emmanuel College. Dr. Zarakol's primary research interests are in international security (with an emphasis on approaches rooted in social theory and historical sociology). More specifically, she works on the evolution of East and West relations in the international order, declining and rising powers, and politics of non-Western regional powers. She has secondary research interests in the evolution of the modern state and the international system. She is the author of After Defeat: How the East Learned to Live with the West (Cambridge Studies in International Relations, no.118, Cambridge University Press, 2011; published with a new introduction in Turkish as Yenilgiden Sonra: Doğu Batı ile Yaşamayı Nasıl Öğrendi (Koç Üniversitesi Yayınları, 2012). Her articles have appeared in journals such as International Organization, International Theory, International Studies Quarterly, European Journal of International Relations, Review of International Studies, among many others. Her research has been supported by a number of academic and government institutions in the UK, North America and Europe, such as the Council on Foreign Relations and the European Research Council. During the 2012-3 Academic Year, she was a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow, with placement on the Capitol Hill. Since 2010, she has been an active member of the PONARS Eurasia international academic network (funded by the Carnegie Foundation) which advances new policy approaches to research and security in Russia and Eurasia. She is currently an editor at Journal of Global Security Studies, and her most recent book is Hierarchies in World Politics (Cambridge Studies in International Relations, no.144, Cambridge University Press, 2017).